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latino president of the united states has been born. now, he could be, or she could be, an infant right now, or in second grade, or in high school, or maybe even in the united states senate. but it's clear from looking at the united states and the changes in our demography that latinos will continue to play a larger role in national dialogue. if you look at the specifics, in 2004, 7.6 million latinos are said to have voted in the united states. that's according to research that's been done at the national level. in 2008 in a presidential election, that jumped up to 9.7 million. now there are estimates that in this coming election in november, that the number could go all the way up to as high as 12 million. and that number is only going to grow, so i think it makes it all the more relevant to examine the life of somebody like marco rubio. in some respects i kind of think of him a little bit as almost a test case for how the american population relates to a latino politician. that was reason enough for me to write a book about him. because in the same way that you look at the reasons why
's -- frappucinos. most are made in the united states. i realized why i am paying $4 for my frappucino. why is it that you are allowed to -- your able to make lenders in the united states and sell them to these specialty coffee shops. jody explained that the specialty coffee shops have very specified requirements for what they want out of their blunders. one, they don't want any moraes. why? let's say you go to barnes and noble, and i do go to the chain stores still, if you go to starbucks and the blender is making noise you are not going dillinger and going to the store. so, they want to make sure that there is absolutely no noise in the blender. second, for those of you that enjoy frappucinos you know you don't want those ice chips in there so they want to make sure that they actually crushed the ice chips properly. so, what jody was able to do is to actually work with these specialty coffee shops on the design of the blender that they want to come and that is a very difficult process to outsource. you can imagine if you were in china or brazil trying to figure out how to design something
them to bring it back into the united states that the condition that they invest in excellent capital in the united states. we tried to repatriation in 2004 and companies brought back the money and went out to shareholders and there is no actual investments in expansion of capital equipment, so i think having a compromise where you allow companies to repatriate the money coming out of the 35% tax rate, but maybe 10% to 12%, the tie that with actual metrics of expanding the workforce or investment in the united states is something we're looking at. secondly, i am president obama's proposal is a tax credit for companies to bring manufacturing back or invest back in the united states in communities and create jobs and proposed a 20% tax credit for those types of companies. why do you cut the corporate tax rate across the board? my argument for that is i don't think right now that either my law firm was investment bank of wall street needs that. i say let's target to areas that are in economic growth. so i am sympathetic to taxiing if they can be tied to accountability for companies to ac
to a brilliant woman about why is it you are allowed -- able to make splendors in the united states and sell them to specialty coffee shops. jody explained the specialty coffee shops have very specified requirements for what they want out of their blenders. they don't want any noise. you go to a bunch and noble or chain stores and they have the starbucks fare and they're making noise and won't wonder and go into the stores. they want to make sure there is no noise in the blenders. secondly for those who enjoyed cappuccino you know you don't want ice chips so make sure the blenders actually crushed the ice chips properly. so what jody was able to do was actually work with the specialty coffee shops on the design of the blunders they wanted and that is a difficult process to outsource. you can imagine if you were in china or brazil trying to figure out how to design something and interacting with them would be very complicated. the customization of products that allow a small and medium-sized manufacturers know is inherently possible to do in the united states and it wasn't just jody engage in this
democratic majority in the house and senate and let us not forget a supreme court of the united states that was still fairly and the control of liberal democrats. 4 two brief shining years or perhaps baleful years if you don't like the great society but for two years for better or for worse the united states had a government in the way that we often seek of her majesty, having a government that is a group of people who can implement a party platform that can be judged at the next election or serious elections. that is not generally the way the united states operates. courtesy of the constitution drafted in 1787 and what i want to in sister relatively unamended thereafter with regard to the basic structures we live under. the republican president, president johnson, nixon, ford, reagan and george h. w. bush not for a single day had even a single house of congress from their own political party. ronald reagan did have the senate for four years but he never had a full congress that was republican. bill clinton did have a full congress that was republican but bill clinton was democrat. and
managerial job in the world, president of the united states, leader of the free world. my question was how does he do it? how does he decide? how does he make decisions? how does he govern? not the context of the decisions, that's interesting, too, but what is the leadership style? i looked around for books a serious sustained way. >> host: do you see this as a campaign document coming out very close to the elections? >> guest: they do like to time things when people are paying attention and most americans tune in to politics around election time. >> host: each one of the things the with surprise to readers use it twice in the book those democrats this is a very critical study of the obama leadership all of the sources were democrat. tell us about that decision. >> guest: some of the politics longtime technical people in the defense department or the intelligence services and so on but for the most part these are people that worked alongside the president in one capacity or another in the white house and we need federal agencies in the house of congress to see him up close. what i discover
and the united states than it was 30 years ago. if you had compared 30 years ago the united states the difference between the rich and the poor here as opposed to the countries of western europe we were the most egalitarian of countries. now we are the least. we have outstripped everybody else because our capitalism has been relatively robust and when capitalism can do its thing, it polarizes and when a polarizes, it creates an awareness which is probably also occur to you. if a growing number of people are having a hard time and there are are a shrinking number of people collecting enormous wealth, it will occur to you that this is happening and it may develop a resentment against the other group. if you have a system like capitalism coexisting, not that you have to, but if you have a system of capitalism coexisting with a democratic society in which everybody has both in the following insightful occur to a lot of people. week, the majority, are really getting screwed in the economy. the way to fix it, to reverse it, to offset it is to use the political system to get that result. in the politica
frappucinos early in the united states. my first learned that i sit now i know why pay $4 for my frappucinos. i said why is it that you are allowed to -- you are able to make blunders in the united states come and sell them to the specialty coffee shops, and she explained that the specialty coffee shops have specified requirements. one, they won't want illinois is they have starbucks and of the blenders are making noise you aren't going to go into the store. so they want to make sure that there is no malaise. second for those of you you know you don't want those ice chips in there so they want to make sure that it's actually crushed the ice chips properly. so, what he was able to do is actually work with a specialty coffee shop on the design of the blunder they wanted and that is a difficult process to outsource. if you are in china and brazil figuring out how to design something interesting with them would be very complicated. as of the customization of the products that a lot of the small and medium-size manufacturers build is actually inherently impossible to do in the united states and w
of the tape in the united states there are people expressing rage, famous groups taking advantage of an opportunity to try to demonstrate against the united states and to take some fairly moderate governments that are opposed revolutionary in the middle east that want to work with the united states and try to shove them away from us. the worst reaction to this tragedy would be for us to pull away from the middle east. we need to engage the middle east. it is fashionable for people to say the united states doesn't have much influence. it is an excuse not to act. we have a lot of influence. but in any event we do have influence and there's no excuse not to use it to try to shape a better future. the real thing i am worried about in the middle east news what is going on in syria and has been going on for 18 months. it is a struggle that is becoming increasingly violent, increasingly sectarian, sunni against shi'ah and opening the door for al qaeda who loves to exploit chaos for its own agenda. it is now to the point where we have the risk of a sectarian war in syria that not only des
is in the most important managerial job in the world. he is president of the united states leader of the free world and so my question was how does he decide? how does he make decisions? how does he govern? not with the content of the positions are but what is his leadership style? when i looked around for books we looked at this question semiserious and sustained way and they really were none. >> host: do you see this as a campaign coming out close to the american election? >> guest: we do know that most americans do into politics around election time but that is more or less -- is the one of the things that surprised me and will surprise a lot of your readers is that you say twice in the book that all of your sources were democrats and this is a very critical study of obama's leadership that all of your sources for the book were democrats. tell us about that position. >> guest: some of the sources i don't know the politics of who are longtime career technical people and intelligence services and so on but these are people who work alongside the president in one capacity or another in the wh
's in the most managerial job in the world. president of the united states, these are the free world is my question was how does he do it? odyssey make decisions? how does a cover? that's interesting too, but what is his leadership style? when i looked around for books about to dismiss the serious and sustained weight. >> you see this as a campaign document coming up close to the november election? >> guest: well, publishers do like the time for it when attention. most americans tune into politics around election time. that is more or less a happy accident. >> host: one of the things that surprised me and the surprise a lot of the leaders is all of your sources are democrats. this is a very critical study, get all of your sources were democrats. >> guest: some of the sources i don't know the politics of our long-term career and technical people, but for the most part, these are people who work alongside the president and the white house and federal agencies the halls of congress and i got to see him up close. when i discovered much to my surprise is this is an administration that is really
that would trade places with the united states of america. our problems can be solved in our challenges can be met. the path we offer may be harder but it leads to a better place. i am asking you to choose that future. i'm asking you to rally around a set of goals that create new manufacturing jobs here in ohio. that build on what we have already done, to create a new energy strategy for america. building on what we have already done to improve education and break down our -- and turn the page on a decade of war. that is what we can do in the next four years, cincinnati. that is why i'm running for a second term as president of the united states of america. [cheers and applause] [applause] [chanting] >> now i want everybody to be clear the goals we set our concrete and they are achievable. the first part of the plan is to export more products and outsourced cheaper jobs. after a decade of decline, this country has created a half-million new manufacturing jobs in the last two and half years. a whole lot of them here in ohio. when some of these other folks said we should let detroit go bankru
the united states six years atoka in my first i told the mexican people that it was possible to transform mexico. i say that we could turn it into a postal nation with a competitive economy and we could build a first site to with more opportunities for everyone. we have mexico in a safer nation with a strong will of dhaka. i can tell you today we have made great strides and help put mexico on the track to make these decisions a reality. i would like to share some reflections on health care we have a stronger nation. let me start by talking of the transformation of the mexican economy. as you know, we have to confront the global kinnock crisis in memory. mexico was particularly vulnerable because our ties to the american economy which was at the epicenter of the crisis years ago half to and we took the necessary measures to prevent this crisis from becoming a major catastrophe. in doing so we were guided with three basic. financial discipline, economic freedom and increased competitiveness in we stayed after the country. first mexico has strong economic fundamentals. many countries put in
continuing interest in military matters. now, in 1917 the united states goes to war. fdr goes to see what your willson and tells him he wants to resign his post and he wants to be in uniform. wilson said know you're doing an important job where you are. when the united states is deeply involved in world war i, she's determined to get to the western front and against the resistance of his boss, the navy secretary daniels manages and their key to that office in a vaguely military uniform of his own devising. he wears pants tucked into he was a french army helmet and a gas mask. in september of 1939 ranks summer and then came portugal and bulgaria. he's the commander-in-chief of the army that trans with trucks marked tank and whose soldiers trained with hand grenades substituted by eggs. by the time the war has been underway for a number of months, clinton is pretty much with its back to the wall to countries and the netherlands and as most france, denmark, norway have been conquered by the germans and the invasion of britain seems imminent he's determined to try to do something to help the
of the united states is to be able to offer a program to something currently enjoyed. what would your advice about the nature of the concern? going forward? >> well, she needs no advice for me, first of all. >> well played, well done. >> it's quite clear from the trustees program is going to shrink some of the question is the degree of magnitude. a few make these reductions, the lab required that any team above a bit, but below the benchmark returned essentially to the beneficiary in the form of higher benefits. when you reduce the payments, by definition they will be scaling back what they can offer to the beneficiaries to enroll in the program. >> that is a truism, right? that is not a revelation. >> absolutely. >> trustees project that about one third of the program is going to disavow one way or the other. into the plants will close under some beneficiaries will do so because they will be less attractive. and about 60 years time, five years time from the trustee based on actuaries productions will be basically one third more than it is today. for the congressman from florida, 40,000 of t
for the country. against perceived internal and external dangerous forces. israel, united states, first at the regime. vicious than enough of that over the decades and afterward he went from credence to that notion, that paranoia. so the syrian population made this bargain with the regime that they would give freedoms in return for stability and security, especially with the examples of instability in lebanon and iraq on their borders. and so, that was the mandate. that was legitimacy for the asides to rule. they lost that because of the policy and bashar al-assad unleashing the dogs in terms of cracking down the opposition. his policy in instability and insecurity. so he no longer has legitimacy. in a broader sense he is solid. whether he stays in power, he'll never have the mandate to rule again and legitimacy he once enjoyed. >> host: are western policymakers assuming his fall is inevitable? and should they? >> guest: that's interesting. i've been contacted by media outlets wanting a quarter to an obituary for about a year now. every time the call, i say it's premature because the re
last october at the values voter summit. it has been crisscrossing the united states registering voters of sporting concerted candidates are running for office, and shining the light on this administration and its failed policies. please take a few minutes to step on board between new and to, today and tomorrow. it's parked recognize the exhibit hall. just follow the signs. you can't miss it. speaking of the exhibit hall we are delighted to have many profamily conservative organizations from all over the country or exhibiting with us. in fact, the second year in a row with so many we had to overflow in the air on the other side of the exhibit hall and was called birdcage walk. we plan to visit these wonderful exhibitors and to show them your appreciation for all the work they do. we are pleased to have our good friend of the media research center again as or sponsor of new media wrote located in the ballroom and, of course, you'll be hearing from a president roosevelt later in the program. almost finished. hang in there. i'm trying to make these announcements as dynamic as possible. [la
way? what constitutes the wrong way? here in united states and in the middle east there is enormous debate over how to handle iran's pursuit of a nuclear enrichment capability, a capability which would give iran the ability to manufacture nuclear weapons if they chose to do so. and obvious a this is an issue that's been with us for a very long time. i remember i first encountered it in immediate aftermath of the gulf war in 1991 when israel purchased 25 longer-range f-15 e. strike fighters. and those fighters were designated not f-15 e., but f-15-i. and the manufacture said that the i was for israel. if you spoke to israeli air force pilots and commanders, what the uniform would say to you is now now now that i is for iraq. this is an issue, this is a problem, it is a threat that the israelis have been thinking about for a very long time. they has been a great deal of effort trying to figure out how to develop a military option to disarm iran, to destroy its nuclear program if they ever chose to do so. and they've been working very deciduous lead at the. but by the same token, you w
that it is going as you will understand the united states we understand of madison and jefferson and washington how they form the country but would be a very good basis for understanding what was going on in the united states so current china was very much shaped by deng xiaoping. he came to power in 1978 and was the dominant person right up until 1992 for the period of about 14 years. what i thought i would do in the brief time today i was told to not talk for more than 20 minutes would be to talk about some of the forces that shaped what he was and what he did to transform china because 1978 the country that he inherited had a per capita income of less than $100 per capita. now is estimated somewhere rs/6000 and it's on the path of that he is headed on. there is almost no migration from the countryside in the city and since he came perhaps 200 million have moved from the countryside to the town and the city. when he came to power the country was still involved in the cultural revolution and the relevant nettie toward each other and he worked to unite the country to set it on the new path. what ar
outgoing mexican president felipe calderon on his country's relations with the united states. >> president obama held a campaign rally in milwaukee over the weekend, one month before early voting begins in this battleground state of wisconsin. [cheers and applause] >> this was the president's first visit to the state since february. a recent quinnipiac university/new york times/cbs poll of likely voters in wisconsin found president obama leading mitt romney 51-45%. this is about half an hour. [cheers and applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ [cheers and applause] >> hello, wisconsin! [cheers and applause] oh! hi! you guys sound like you're fired up already! [cheers and applause] it is good to be back in milwaukee! [cheers and applause] first of all, it's good to be back because this is the closest i've been the home in a couple of months -- [cheers and applause] i was thinking about hopping on the freeway and just driving on down. you know, hour and a half, maybe a little shorter with a motorcade, you know? [laughter] i am also glad to be in milwaukee because before i came out here, i was able to have an
to the way the united states was able to pursue the pacific war in the year after pearl harbor. shortly after the end of the guadalcanal campaign which was 1943, a correspondent named eugene burns wrote a very good contemporary book called "then there was one." and that title refer today the fact that at the height of the guadalcanal campaign, which was the most closely-fought air/sea/land campaign in the war, only enterprise remained afloat of our six carriers that had combat in the pacific in 1942. the only other survivor was uss saratoga which sustained heavy battle damage on two occasions and, therefore, missed almost the entirety of that year. so considering that ed stafford wrote a 200,000-word or book about the enterprise, what is it that here 50 years later warrants another one? and i think there's a couple of reasons. number one, stafford's book is superb on the aviation aspects of the various unions, the squadrons that rotated enterprise during the entire war. but he's told me in a couple of e-mails that he wished he had been able to write a longer book -- and it took him five years
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 21, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable richard blumenthal, a senator from the state of connecticut, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader smed. mr. reid: i had move to proceed to calendar number 504. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 504, s. 3525, a bill to protect and enhance opportunities for recreational hunting, fish, and shooting and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: the next hour will be equally divided between the two leader leaders who are their designees.
to be realistic about how we can tackle these challenges. if there is a crisis that i see in the united states for the long term, it is not the temporal issue of how we will deal with money. because i am very confident we will be able to deal with that. it is how will we bring that -- bring back our sense of what we can accomplish together as americans when we are realistic about those challenges. that is the thing i think about the word "crisis" in this country. >> mayor castro is not the first to suggest that. for 10 years now, we heard that the government is not asking all of us to do enough. >> it is interesting. the word "sacrifice," when i hear a politician say that, it usually means grab your wallet. it usually means increasing taxes. and i will give president obama credit to in his the first presidential candidate since walter mondale to run explicitly on a platform that he will raise taxes. >> he is saying he will raise taxes on the wealthy. >> according to the supreme court, he already has raised taxes. that was the basis on which the supreme court of held obamacare, that it was a ta
change in the united states and how it's been shifted pretty rapidly over time as the great state of nevada. obama is running ahead of though not nearly as far as he did in 2008. but it still will cut off on my monitor but you can see an incredible increase of nine percentage points for the share of eligible voters who are minorities according to the data between 2008 and 2012. that's a massive demographic tide against the republicans and you can see there's been a decline of five percentage points in the share of voters that are colleges john became group into bills and eight. that is a very quick run through some of the swing states in the 2008 election. maybe it's time for me to step back, catch my breath and just say why is this. why is this going on? why does obama have the lead he does? why is from the having difficulty, and what many people argue should be the core limping along economy and a president that has done so much as the defense and its face it popular at the beginning like the health care reform act and so long, the stimulus looked upon unfavorably by a lot of vo
to take action against terrorist the plots. whether it confronts us here in the united states or abroad. in june of 2009, fbi directer acknowledged the challenge facing the bureau stating, "it is not sufficient for us as an organization to respond to a terrorist attack after it has occurred. it is important for us as an organization to develop the intelligence to anticipate the terrorist attack developing intelligence, developing facts. and the past we looked at collecting facts for the courtroom. we now have to think of ourselves as gathering facts painting a picture of a particular threat understanding the risk and moving to reduce that risk. and i couldn't agree more with the directer's statement. and then on november 5, 2009, a gunman walked in the soldier readiness center at fort hood, texas and shouted the jihaddic term. and opened fire on unarmed soldiers and civilians. he killed 13 and wounded 43 42 others. was the most horrific terrorist attack on the u.s. soil since 9/11. today we will exam the facts of the fort hood case as we know them to better understand how these facts
, but that is critical cause more trouble than any of the problem we've got fiscally in the united states. getting medicare costs under control is the number-one thing. >> you say we also surcharged smokers and the obese for their medicare coverage. where did that idea come from? >> i am the person that put it in the memo but i didn't have to fight very hard for it. also, i ran into this, something i ran in "the washington post" install of calling people morbidly obese i called them mega fatties and i was refuted by "the washington post" for being insensitive, which i guess i probably am. this is another thing where everybody knows this to be true and someone has to pay for it. there should be penalties. i'm not really a democrat but i'm certainly democrat compared to him. you have to be responsible to some extent for your personal behavior. someone is going to pay for it. >> quite right. we should point out also we are not only ones making arguments like this. there are other bipartisan commissions and so forth. the task force that was headed by a was rivlin and pete domenici, a democrat and repu
difficult issues that face the united states. so we are happy to have you. it's important to remember that yes, let's have quick applause for bob turner. [applause] do you know why? he may one day become a kingmaker himself. what we have to point out is acknowledging bob turner's election is that it requires for [inaudible conversations] across party lines. if you didn't know, bob turner is a republican in what would be otherwise considered a democratic district of brooklyn. mayor koch is not the first time -- and queens, you're right. so sorry. thank you for correcting me. but this is not the first time that mayor koch has crossed party lines. of course, remember, he voted for george bush in the second election, 2004. he actually famously said i don't agree with a single thing that george bush -- >> single domestic issue. >> with the exception of the fact that i think he is handling terrorism and a superior way. and that he was the most important issue. in the case of the movements, support for bob turner, you and i did an event shortly thereafter in which you explained your support
's been lacking. it's embarrassing to me for the nearly years i have been a member of the united states national not to see that leadership exhibited in the united states of america. thank you, mr. president. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from mississippi. mr. cochran: mr. president, this week my home state of mississippi received the sobering news that our economy had slipped back into recession. frankly, i'm concerned that my state may be a harbinger for the rest of the country. despite national efforts to create new jobs and opportunities, our economy is not getting significantly bett better. it is a problem, we think. in most states unemployment has remained over 8% for more than three years despite spending nearly $1 trillion with the president's 2009 stimulus package. investments in small business growth have languished, and they've done this in a state of the economy, tax policy, federal regulations that seem to have made matters worse. the course we're on is simply not good enough. we hope and we urge the senate to make a strong stand. let's get to
important managerial job in the world. president of the united states leader of the free world. my question was, how does he do a? how does he decide? how does he make incisions? how does the governor? >> the senate is about to return from recess for a series of those. a bill to continue funding the government for six months. a bill sponsored by montana senator, jon tester to ease regulations and was on some outdoor sports, fishing and hunting. and a bill by kentucky senator, randy paul to cut off u.s. aid to pakistan, libya and egypt. this is live coverage of the senate on c-span 2. senate will come to order. mr. leahy: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont is recognized. mr. leahy: mr. president seeing the distinguished chairman of the foreign relations committee in the chair, i have a feeling i may be preaching to the converted but let me say that we were -- all of us were outraged by the mob that denigrated the muslim faith -- or by the video that denigrated the muslim faith but then by the mob violence, some of it rep
for the members of united states supreme court. they should have single terms. that's a small deal when we're talking that fundamental change. so let me suggest proposals that i would like to see argued about on c-span. and incidentally, let me also say because another question someone might have in mind come where did it come from. i have an answer to that. and it's based on a wonderful book written by paul woodruff called first democracy, which, in fact, returns to ancient athens and suggests that we select more leaders than we do our lottery. whether or not the house and senate should be selected by lottery we can debate, but it seems to me that it would be wonderful, select members of the convention by lottery. basically nationwide jury. then the three proposal i would like to hear them discuss, not necessary in order of importance, first of all, how do we adjust institutions developed in 1787 under the assumption of rule by the neville and political elites -- who would more or less share a notion of the public interest. how do we make those institutions congruent with the kind of part
views. i think it's a problem. it is technologically possible, but the united states, for example, also invests on unabash edly in technology if a government turns off the internet, turn off global networks redecent bandwidth can be brought in. it's a losing game to try to shut off peoples' access to information. to wall off peoples' access to the digital environment. it blew up in mubarak's taste. the fact that he shut them off helped contributed to the panic and history ya in egypt. glig on that note of extra bandwidth can be brought us how has the borderless internet effected old fashioned question of state sovereignty, the board of governor invest in a lot of firewall technology used in china and iran and elsewhere? >> guest: the internet is disruptive in a variety of different ways. part of the way it is disruptive it can challenge the traditional notion of state sovereignty. bytes and bytes don't care where the physical border a pact is. we can see this, right now, for example in relation around internet governments. there a lot of governments that fear the loss of control that co
-year plan. how many of you have studied the plan? you know, in the united states and u.s. context, the entire idea of five-year plans sounds preposterous. they are taken serious in china and this one in particular is like a chain in the curve for the chinese economy. it says basically looking backwards china's successes have almost been enough low-wage factoriescome the building, road roads and all the rasputin the future under this plan they want to have more high-tech. they want infotech industry from a biotech industry coming clean take energy and aerospace industry. so the idea of the country can move from its current level of technology is something played out in this industry and a lot of others. another major theme you see about china in this field and others is the style of what i think of as the real estate centric theory of modernization. if you look for an explanation of almost anything happening in china now and say well why is the seaport go in there? why is this ancient village removed? why is x, y or z happening? real estate deals may not be the only answer, but usu
that takes place in the united states where i now live and work. canadian police arrested muslims for plotting to blow up the parliament and the head of the prime minister. they called the campaign of operation bodr. it's a tribute to the first decisive military victory of the prophet mohammed. the police knew that religious symbolism helped inspire the toronto's 17. still at the press briefing to announce those, the police did not mention the words muslim or islam. the second meeting of the press they boasted and brag about avoiding the world's muslims and islam. they had organized in the name of islam. three months later of a police conference i raised my concern about the silence. after my plea for honesty several law enforcement insiders independent of each other confided to me that the lawyers prevented these authorities from publicly uttering the words muslims and islam. as for my experience in the united states, here is a concrete one. in 2009i received media calls about david headley, and u.s. citizen that planned the terrorist attacks on bombay in 2008 in other words a ye
reauthorization makes plain that discrimination is not the policy of these united states. it says no program funded by federal vawa dollars can turn away a domestic violence victim because of their sexual orientation or their gender identity, whether the victim is gay or straight, american indian, white, black or latino, in my view, madam president, and in the view of so many in this chamber, they deserve protection from abuse and justice for their abusers. there are two other important changes in this vawa reauthorization as passed through the senate. both of which help ensure we bring perpetrators to justice no national who their victims are or where the claims are committed. these help law enforcement to secure needed testimony from victims who are unwilling to come forward due to reasonable fears of deportation. so in total, all three of these important changes to the substance and scope of vawa i think strengthen it, i think carry forward its initial spirit and i think are completely appropriate things for this senate and the house to do in our every five-year reconsideration and reauth
, tribal, territorial and international partners and members of this committee. while the united states has made significant progress since the 9/11 attacks, we know threats from terror persist and continually evolve. we faced direct threats from al qaeda. we face growing threats of other foreign-based terrorist groups, which are inspired by al qaeda ideology, such as hq ap and al-shabaab. we must address threats that are homegrown as well as those that originate abroad. is threats are not limited to any one individual, group or ideology and as we have seen taxes employed by terrorists can be as simple as a homemade bomb or as sophisticated as the biologic threat or coordinated cyberattack. while we deal with a number of threats and threat actors at any given time, three areas merit special sustained attention. the first is aviation. christmas day 2000 plot, the october 2010th air cargo thread in the aqa peapod earlier this year would have targeted a u.s. bound airliner with explosives made clear that commercial aviation remains a target. terrace, especially aqap continue to seek ways to ci
was essential to the way the united states was able to pursue the pacific war after pearl harbor. shortly after the end of the guadalcanal campaign which was early 43 and the correspondent wrote a very good contemporary book that title referred to the fact at the heart of the canal can pay and which was the closely fought campaign in the pacific war enterprise was in our carriers combat in the pacific in 1922 the only other survivor was the uss saratoga which sustained on two occasions and therefore miss to the entirety for that year of years later couple reasons. number one, stafford's book is superb on the aviation aspects of the various unions, the squadrons that go through the enterprise during the entire war but he's told in a couple of e-mails he wished that they had been able to write a longer book and a road to the cut took him five years to write this one that would include more of the ship's company with with the navy called white hats, the steelers between them and the commission officers and the sheep petty officers who need the ship work and consequently, i wanted to devote a good
right now . socialized medicine in the united states of america. what is that about care so as it about writing the book to it ocd ronnie touched on this because this was one of the central arguments. as i started to write ipod, well, of course obama is redistributing wealth here tell he is a socialist. in fact, i have a section in the book called this a socialist is a big fat liar. i was on with neil cavuto last week. he said to me, come on. look at this title. cassette, tell me what part of that is inaccurate. he is skinny. he goes on the secret burger runs, but he's not taking any rate. he's a socialist. he's lied to the american people day in and day out. prime example, will cut the deficit in half and my first term we all know how that turned out. he inherited a for under $50 billion annual deficit. he has quadrupled the. every year he's been in office he has run between 13 and $17 trillion annual deficit . added five to international debt and just three years. to give it to see -- this white. it took in three years at 5 trillion. for the first 216 years of the republic that is how
to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 20, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable tom udall, a senator from the state of new mexico, to perform the duties f the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i would yield to my friend from delaware and ask that i be recognized when he finishes his remarks. the presiding officer: the senator from delaware. mr. coons: thank you very much, mr. president. i rise today to express my gratitude to leader reid, to chaplain black, to all of us in the chamber and my gratitude to the reverent dr. dug gerdts. it is my honor and privilege to welcome him to our chamber this morning as one of delaware's finest leaders. reverend gerdts leads the congregation at first and centr
was left an odd man out. steve found solace in studying the writings of captain alfred of the united states navy. probably one of the most influential and large it's forgotten military the interests of his state. one of the first strategist understand what we call geopolitics, the idea that nations and cultures are largely shaped by their geography and their ability to defend themselves or to attack others is governed primarily by their waterways. importantly, man was a close friend. he would count was station off the coast of peru. one day he is relaxing in the english slaver reading a book on the worst. he was hit by an important epiphany. all that business of hannibal crossing the alps with elephants to attack from was a large waste of time and money. if cartages have had a sufficient navy to defeat the room and navy there would have been no need to cross the straits of gibraltar campaign up through spain and crossed the pyrenees and the alps and finally down into italy because he could simply sale of the mediterranean attack from directly. inspired by his new understanding of navies and
bless america, these united states. thank you very much everybody. i hope you get the book. [applause] mike has agreed to take a couple of questions before we get out of here. the first one, right here. >> we did not bring issues. >> where is chick-fil-a? >> it was getting too cold. we will make the diet that i could hear your answer because there were too many -- prius is clicking by. what was your answer about why they don't have any conservative moderators in the upcoming debate? >> it's a perfect metaphor for the machine we are up against. if you expect this is going to be an easy ride for governor romney, it's not in its unbelievable there are going to be liberals who are going to be moderating the debates. the bardot is a so much higher for governor romney then it is president obama and we know that going in and we have to accept that it's tough. >> the next question over here. 's vi of the quick question. my first question is what is this thing between you and hewitt concerning the -- [inaudible] >> apparently you're not you are not supposed to say his name because he moved the
think for example that some day that the world will go to mars lead by the united states then you are going to need something like this space station partnership and the confidence building that has already taken place to also participate in that mission and so there is a policy issue that you may wish to consider and that is that as people renegotiate the international space station partnership, you could add to it some goals that are related to the development of the technology from beyond lao exploration to the space station partnership so that they began to develop an awareness of the really great challenges and technical challenges that will face all of us as we tried to get to mars and we begin to enlist them in the effort. and that could -- i don't know whether that would serve as a precursor for the partnership we have built but it certainly would build -- be a confidence builder and i think it would help start the process off in a way that is useful to the united states. >> one other comment i would add to that is, we are all aware that the space station was nearly cancel
for the viewrs of others. and he disassociated the united states from the hateful video that was made in california that derotted the prophet mohammed and islam. and the president said this is his main point, he was passionate about it. the americans have an abiding belief in made a compelling case mr.. he also had a message for iran and that is that while we want to negotiate our differences through diplomacy if that's possible, that time is not unlimited. i thought it was a warning to the iranian government is a difficult deal with. i thought it was a important speech that the president gave yesterday in my. >> >> host: how about mitt romney can, you assess from what yoaf heard and have seen over the months. is there anything close to what you might call a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encaps late it? >> guest: he it a smart and successful person. he's been talking about foreign policy. it's not the issue he wants to emphasis in the campaign. he wants the campaign to be obviously about the economy and about our unemployment rate. and it's an unusual position for r
. very clearly. we will wipe out israel. when the united states of america then we go after this sunday people, the christians to send you a message. you have to wake up many people think not in my backyard. if it is it is really is a year backyard. what is the connection between hezbollah and iran and venezuela? why do they work together and they fly a the slides from here to caracas? hatred of the shared values the american values of what you represent. this comes from our brand and will come to the shores of the united states. we will all remember the attack of 9/11. and to attack the towers of new york city, i can share with all due respect to our intelligence if al qaeda wanted to attack the towers but they chose to attack in the u.s. in washington d.c. to send a message. so for that i hope the united states whoever is elected will take a decision to stop the nuclear race today. something very interesting when you look at the arab leaders they are afraid from iran becoming nuclear so for that matter i think we would like to take action for the u.s. to sit idly by israel has to do i
judiciary led the way to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and oral brennan to the supreme court, but the host of liberal republicans such as the president appointed himself like albert title of georgia and john of louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment i think that eisenhower made at that time is that of john marshall hall of the great conservative justice and just after the landmark decision in brown v board of education. shortly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died leaving the vacancy on the court, and at that point roosevelt turned to the grandson of the great marshall harlem who would be the only dissenter in percy versus ferguson and 1896, the case legalized segregation by appointing the great dissenter eisenhower was making a statement he could not have adored. he said eisenhower was going to enforce it. when the segregation attempted to swap the integration in little rock eisenhower sent
are being smaller and one way you do that as is this idea of having crews fly from the united states to overseas operating theaters to replace each other to a policy sometimes called cruise swaps or think swaps. it's hard to do and in fairness to the navy it's already been done on some ships and in fairness to the navy so i think that's the kind of idea that needs to be expanded and generalize because we need more innovative ways of using late lamented -- limited sources of what we are to have. >> going forward regardless of who is president the administration may change but the math remains the same. there are some hard fiscal issues they will have to deal with an and defense is going to have hard strategic choices and i look forward to getting past the election when we can see whatever administration is in charge and what they start to do in terms of making the strategic choices but the longer you wait the tougher the decisions get. this idea that both sides are pursuing, setting a particular budget target and saying that is what we are going to stick to and fill in the strategy be
they're policies are, look at the map. look at the map of the united states in terms of seas, prom mentors, harbors these, coast of the united states, the 13 colonies, was jam packed with great natural harbors. the whole coast of africa, thousands of miles, relatively few good harbors which hindered africa's development, but the east coast was packed with them, and the united states, the continental core of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the zone that was settled and waterways flowing in a convenient east-west fashion than the rest of the world's waterways combined. so i'm saying that americans -- we're important not only because of their ideas and their democracy but because of where we happen to live as well, and so that's why these things, like mountains matter. the himalayas matter. they have allowed india and china to develop into who completely disstink great world civilizations without having much to do with each other, through long periods of history. >> so let's take that image that you offered of america, this amazingly suitable geographical place with all th
, to create air force base in many places around the united states were drone pilots everything being trained for drones are being tested or piloted. so this is a new kind of warfare, where you don't even have to be in the area of the battle. you can be thousands and thousands of miles away thinking that the battlefield to a video screen. in fact, the manufacturers admit that the screens are really -- design is taken taken from the video games that teenagers have grown up playing and it's easier for them when they are recruited and become drone pilot. they are used to using these kinds of playstation. enjoy. in fact, the u.n. has u.s. has created a playstation mentality through war. it is a very surreal thing to think about pilot been in an air force base in the united states over the drones are being run by the cia they are, they can be outside of virginia and they are in an air-conditioned room. they are sitting in an ergonomic chair and they are looking for hours and hours on end at a scene in a place that they may never have been to. don't sleep the language, don't know the closer. and th
. it is the overtime that jews as a class have been expelled from anywhere in the united states. and around 1982, new information concerning the order had he come available from the association that published ulysses s. grant's papers. and so i began to prepare my remarks i put on the new suit and my talk seemed to be going well until i approached the subject of smuggling. ulysses s. grant was completely concerned about the north and the south. and since some of the smugglers that these troops caught were jews, he concluded that all jews or smugglers. that pointed out that we now know that smuggling was rampant was by no means a jewish monopoly. the continued rants own father, jesse grant was engaged in a clandestine scheme to move southern cotton northway. his partner was a jewish clothing manufacture and send them back. no sterner with those words out of my mouth and began to shift uneasily in the room and the pioneering of the american jewish historian buried his face in his hands. it was out of this world. i said something went terribly wrong. so the archives i didn't know what the problem was. s
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